Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Bilge Water Blog #158

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

This post is a bit out of order. I filmed this right after I discovered that the fuel tanks had been leaking and before I started removing the old tanks. My big concern was to get the contaminated water out of the bilge.  I need to have a functioning bilge pump, but I can’t allow the pump to engage when there’s fuel in the bilge. Nope, wouldn’t be good.

I used a hand pump to pump out the bilges into jerry cans. With that out of the way, I used some oil absorbent pads, and some eco-friendly grease cutter to clean the mess up. I am pleased with the result. It was a quck job and not as gross & messy as I had anticipated.

It’s good to have clean bilges, dry and tight. With this little job done we can move on to building the new tanks.

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Raymarine i70s Blog# 154

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

I do apologize for the quality of this video. I primarily use a GoPro to record all my videos.  In this video the result is that all the light sources show up really brightly. So when I show the display of the i70 it just shows as white light. 😦  sorry about that.

 

 

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Cabinetry & A new dingy seat Blog# 151

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

Time to get busy repairing the dingy seat along with some other little chores.

Chore one: plumb the fresh water intake for the head.  The hose that I had originally installed would have worked but it would have been under stress and we all know how things under stress last when at sea. They don’t. Invariably they break. So solutions are in order.

Chore two: the dingy seat.  After creating a glass sandwich I needed to fill the edges for strength, cosmetics, and comfort.

Chore three: Fabricate the cabinet front for the Electra Scan.

 

 

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Glass & Biley wiring Blog# 147

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

More bilge pump wiring, and more liquid joinery.

Some discussion about the price of electronic parts. Quite ridiculous. Obscene even. But it is what it is and if I want to get things done and done nicely, it’s going to cost a bit.

 

 

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 goes for a sail! Blog # 142

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

I enjoy working on Little Bear. Really, I do. But after two years I’m really itching to get out there on the water.  So, even though the boat isn’t really ready, although there are tools and parts scattered all over, although the head doesn’t work, although the lights are only half working – I decided to get out for a sail. Sail meaning ‘motor’.

July first; Canada’s 150th birthday seemed like as good an occasion to get out and go for a trip down the river and around the bend. So that’s what we did. Dread Pirate Admiral & a friend took Little Bear out to see the fireworks in White Rock…

 

Of course, seeing fireworks means that we’d be out in the dark. The Admiral said that without a head there was no way we’d be anchoring out so we had to navigate back to the dock in the dark. Fortunately the tide was right and we managed to get her back to her slip without mishap.  Although it was a bit of a white knuckle ride up the river.

Special thanks go out to all the power boats with their 5′ wakes blasting past us to create the atmosphere of a hurricane in full fettle.  So kind and thoughtful of you. Blessings.

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Splish Splash! Blog #139

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

At long last! A major milestone has been reached. The day I have been looking forward to for a very long time – launch day.

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: SAILS! Blog #138

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

The suit of sails I inherited with the boat are original equipment. That means that the sails are 41 years old. The genoa had been left to the wind and was tattered and torn. It was the first thing I threw out when I brought the boat home. The main sail has been stuffed in my shop-locker for the last two  years. I have had it out a couple of times to look at and refold, but my impression of it was that it was better suited as material for a sack rather than a mainsail.

In this episode I take delivery of three new sails. My new genoa (130%), stays’l, and main. This is what a suit of new sails from North Sails look like being installed:

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.