Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Wiring the Pulpit Blog # 143

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

Ok, let’s get this out-of-the-way first:  In this vid there is some pixellation / editing going on.  Some intrepid viewers have already raised an eyebrow and asked.  So here’s the somewhat embarrassing tale of woe.

The blue coveralls I am wearing are cheap, paper, throw-away coveralls. I like them because they breathe really well so I stay cool. However, they have one MAJOR design flaw. When worn, if the wearer bends over far, or squats the crotch rips out.  In fact it rips out without so much as a “how do you do?”.  At least with fabric the wearer gets the tell-tale ripping sound with these things … nothing.  So I was happily vlogging away completely oblivious to the naughtycal wardrobe malfunction exposing the main junction.

I didn’t realize it till I got home and started to edit the vid. I then took about 5 minutes out of my day to laugh at my  idiotic self.  Once the giggle fit ended I decided not to re-do the vlog but to just edit out with a pixel mask any offensive bits that may or may not have been making a bid for freedom.

Truth be told, while this catastrophe was unfolding I, being a neighbourly type, helped a boat returning to the dock get tied up. All the while oblivious to John Thomas making his début appearance. I did notice the odd looks but they were thankful for the help, so I suppose it’s all good in the end. So to speak.

So that being said, this vid isn’t about old pirates being blissfully oblivious much to the chagrin of the boating public. It is about wiring the pulpit and replacing the pulpit lights.

Enjoy. And don’t laugh.

 

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

 

 

 

I said, don’t laugh.

Little Bear Westsail 32 goes for a sail! Blog # 142

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

I enjoy working on Little Bear. Really, I do. But after two years I’m really itching to get out there on the water.  So, even though the boat isn’t really ready, although there are tools and parts scattered all over, although the head doesn’t work, although the lights are only half working – I decided to get out for a sail. Sail meaning ‘motor’.

July first; Canada’s 150th birthday seemed like as good an occasion to get out and go for a trip down the river and around the bend. So that’s what we did. Dread Pirate Admiral & a friend took Little Bear out to see the fireworks in White Rock…

 

Of course, seeing fireworks means that we’d be out in the dark. The Admiral said that without a head there was no way we’d be anchoring out so we had to navigate back to the dock in the dark. Fortunately the tide was right and we managed to get her back to her slip without mishap.  Although it was a bit of a white knuckle ride up the river.

Special thanks go out to all the power boats with their 5′ wakes blasting past us to create the atmosphere of a hurricane in full fettle.  So kind and thoughtful of you. Blessings.

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Splish Splash! Blog #139

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

At long last! A major milestone has been reached. The day I have been looking forward to for a very long time – launch day.

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Out with the old! Blog #129

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

This post should have come before the previous post but in a fit of air-headedness, I got them reversed. Ces’t la vie.

I got the old zinc’s off, and I took out the old speed-log through Hull. I tried to remove the thru-hull elegantly and properly but it proved to difficult for culture and class. So, I resorted to a small sledge and smashed it out. 😀 When all else fails, get a bigger hammer.

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Of Zinc & Holes Blog #128

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

With the major projects on Little Bear winding up, I have a minor project to get done: New Zinc’s. Not much mystery surrounding this project – take the old ones off, put the new ones back on. All shiny and clean.

This is what the old ones looked like.

I’m no expert on electrolytic or galvanic corrosion but these zincs look pretty bad. I have NO idea when they were replaced last, but I’m glad the prop & shaft and other bits of metal in the boat aren’t adversely affected.

The other smallish project I’m tackling is the installation of my ‘tri-ducer’. The challenge with this is that the new thru-hull is larger than the current hole in the boat. Which means I have to employ my genius super-power and figure out how to enlarge the existing hole. How will I do it? Ah, grasshopper, when you are ready the solution will come….

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Boom Install Blog #127

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

Putting the boom back in place should be a simple and straightforward little chore. Not so.

Once again, my ingenuity has been challenged and my DIY skills have been tested. The issue with this project was the bolts holding the boom in place on the mast. In my research I discovered that there isn’t a lot of stress placed on the up / down (vertical) travel of the boom. The bulk of the pressure is applied horizontally. When the sails are up and pulling, the boom is pressing into the mast. So with this bit of knowledge I wasn’t too concerned about the bolts in the mast.

With the old bolt holes stripped out I had the option of moving the goose-neck up above the old holes, or down, below them. I called the sail maker and asked what direction I should go. He responded that going up would be the appropriate choice. So that’s where the goose neck went – about 6″ higher than it was. This choice will come back to bite me in the bum at a later date.

Never-the-lesss, here’s how it went down:

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Jacked! Blog #116

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

20,000 lbs is a lot of anything. 20,000lbs of boat finely balanced on smallish bits of wood and 6 metal stands is intimidating to work under. Jacking up that 20,000lbs so that it is resting on less than smallish bits of wood and 4 stands is somewhat worrisome. But I did it. It had to be done and no one else was going to do it. So I did it.

I didn’t drop the boat. I didn’t crush my skull or anything else. I jacked it up, I jacked it down. Much ado about nothing.

With the keel blocks moved I took advantage of the dry somewhat sunny weather to paint the unpainted spots. I have managed to get 4 coats of Interprotect on those spots so all that remains is to paint with Coppercoat. But that’s a job for another day.

As always fair winds, following seas, and God bless.