Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Grub-a-Dub-Dub Vlog # 163

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

The less romantic and idyllic part of boat ownership is the not so picturesque job of cleaning. All boats need cleaning. Some get cleaned, others not so much. It’s sad to see neglected boats. And I see a lot of them.

The case in point: Little Bear.  The fuel tank holds are nasty. The starboard side must have been leaking for years. The foam around the tank is soaked in ancient diesel and the engine pan  that it sits on is stained by diesel and rust.  That’s gonna change. Today.

I do apologize for the audio quality and the sheer boring aspect of this video but I wanted to show that it’s not all exotic destinations, white sand beaches, bikini’s and buff bodies. To get to that point a lot of work and associated sweat needs to happen.

So I’m putting my scrub brush where my  mouth is. Ew. That was a mistake. But I think you get what I mean.

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Glorious Sanding! Vlog #159

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

Procrastination.  Oh boy, the killer of progress. Yes it is. focusing on the necessary over the important only delays the important. The important still has to be done, but now it’s later than anticipated.  What am I talking about?

The weather is beautiful so I chose to work on the deck. Do a little sanding. Pretty easy, needs to be done. But at the expense of moving the fuel tank project forward.  Oh well. It’s only time right?

There is always a consequence for putting things off. You’d think at my age I would know that. And in reality, intellectually, I do. But I still do it. Do you? Ok, I know you do, so don’t get all judgy on my butt.

I did get a lot of the sanding done albeit not in time to paint before the cold and rainy weather set in. Winter on the west coast is wonderful.  No now to shovel. 🙂

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Bilge Water Blog #158

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

This post is a bit out of order. I filmed this right after I discovered that the fuel tanks had been leaking and before I started removing the old tanks. My big concern was to get the contaminated water out of the bilge.  I need to have a functioning bilge pump, but I can’t allow the pump to engage when there’s fuel in the bilge. Nope, wouldn’t be good.

I used a hand pump to pump out the bilges into jerry cans. With that out of the way, I used some oil absorbent pads, and some eco-friendly grease cutter to clean the mess up. I am pleased with the result. It was a quck job and not as gross & messy as I had anticipated.

It’s good to have clean bilges, dry and tight. With this little job done we can move on to building the new tanks.

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Clean up & Test fit Blog #157

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

Both tanks are out, so now it’s time to start the replacement phase of the project. Step one is to get all the old expanding foam and assorted hardware removed to create a nice warm, welcoming spot for the new tanks to inhabit.  There really wasn’t much technical about it – peel off, dig out,  the foam cut out the old straps and viola! Done. Well, mostly done. The tank holds are now ready to do some test fitting of a new template tank.

The first rendition of the tank template was made out of cardboard.  It was designed from the  blue prints of the original tanks. The modification that was made was to remove about 6″ from the bottom of the tank in order to make it fit. I don’t believe there exists such a beast as a modular tank. The new tanks will have to go in, in one piece.

Spoiler alert: The cardboard template didn’t fit.  The reason was not what I suspected. In the vid. I stated that there was an old exhaust hose that had been routed up & around the tank and a couple of metal straps, and some wiring.  Well none of that was the reason the tank would not fit.

The reason was the width of the tank across the top. The space in the hold is 16″ wide. The tanks are 23″ wide. So….. how to reshape the template to make it fit?  I don’t want to kill the volume of the tanks. They were designed to hold 38 Gallons of fuel. If I lose 5 or  10 gallons I could live with that but any more would be unacceptable.

Like most projects I undertake, I figured it out. But if you want to know … you’ll have to wait till next week. 😉

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

 

 

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Bye Bye Rust Bucket Blog# 155

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

In this episode, I have to tackle a chore that I wasn’t expecting to have to tackle for a couple of years – the fuel tanks. When I bought the boat I knew the starboard side take was kaput.  The PO told me as much.  The starboard tank is divided by a baffle that sections off one part of the tanks for use by the diesel heater.  However it is rusty both top and bottom.  I didn’t realize how bad till I got it out. It was really really bad.

The port side take was ok, at least I thought it was, until the cold snap this winter. I suspect that the old steel could no longer handle the shrinking or expanding due to temperature changes and a seam somewhere started to seep. Not a huge leak but I ended up with a couple of gallons in the bilge. 😦   Not good.

So, both tanks need to come out. Both.

 

I think that the boat was built around the tanks they’re a weird trapeziodal shape designed to follow the shape of the hull.  The old shop manager who built Westsail boats back in the day is still around and sells parts for these old boats. He reckons that the only way to get the tanks out is to remove the engine.  Well from what I saw when I removed the tanks, removing the engine would not have made one whit of difference.  I had to cut them up to get them out.

Needless to say the new ones going back in will not be the same size. They have to be able to be juggled around a bit in order to fit them in. Fun fun fun.  I suppose that unless you purchase a new boat, becoming a boat wright is part of the journey. And that’s not a bad thing. I like learning new skills and learning about my boat and how it’s constructed.

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: Raymarine i70s Blog# 154

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

I do apologize for the quality of this video. I primarily use a GoPro to record all my videos.  In this video the result is that all the light sources show up really brightly. So when I show the display of the i70 it just shows as white light. 😦  sorry about that.

 

 

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.

Little Bear Westsail 32 refit: What’s a ‘Hockle’? Blog# 153

Arrrrr me hearties. Welcome aboard.

What is a hockle? I didn’t know until I saw it and discovered that there’s a technical name for it.  It’s basically a situation where three strand braided rope starts to unbraid and twist.

Time to route the wiring for the Raymarine multi-function device.

 

As always, fair winds following seas, and God bless.